The Sixth Myth

The Sixth Myth: The Seventh Reason

The book MALVINAS/82 – CÓMO Y POR QUÉ (How and Why) identifies six motives and vested interests why Great Britain provoked the South Atlantic conflict.

However, there is a seventh reason underlying the other six, and comprises them all.

Which is that?

In 1982, Great Britain carried out the same forcible act as it did in 1833, when it took illegal possession of the Falklands (that is to say, the Argentine Malvinas). To do so, Great Britain had to portray Argentina as the “aggressor country”. However, this label is very far from the real facts.

Why did Great Britain behave this way?

1st) Great Britain has no geographic, historic or legal title to the Falkland islands.

The only reason why Great Britain occupied the islands in 1833 is because they were stronger. This situation is replicated today, after the 1982 conflict, because, for them, “the military victory confers the right to occupation”.

2nd) Between 1833 and 1982 the following events took place:

– the United Nations was created, and its Decolonization Committee started to dismantle the European colonies in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Suffice it to say that Great Britain itself entered the Falkland islands in the Committee’s list as a territory to be decolonized;

– the U. N. Resolution 2065 was passed, urging Great Britain to negotiate the Falklands’ sovereignty with Argentina; this implied a formidable international pressure;

– Argentina undertook an aggressive DIPLOMATIC campaign during 1981, aimed at obtaining full enforcement of Resolution 2065.

For this reason, Great Britain chose the military confrontation, and made Argentina look as the aggressor; the underlying idea was to cancel all negotiations with Argentina about the Falklands’ sovereignty, “to get the international public opinion to justify its behavior”, and, above all, to establish a military fortress as planned beforehand, in order to “repeal a new Argentine aggression”.

This is absolutely false. Argentina never played the role of the aggressor.

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